In English

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Kenneth Sisam and JRR Tolkien, A Middle English Reader and Vocabulary (7/1)

Dover Publications, 2005. Reissue in its original format of Tolkien's first scientific publication from 1922. 1st edition thus. Paperback.*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. HoughtonMifflin, 1981

1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine dustjacket faded, slight damage to the edges of the dustjacket).*

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. HarperCollins, 2006

Paperback with a new, updated index. On the cover a picture of Tolkien.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight/Pearl/Sir Orfeo. 1975

1st edition
George Allen & Unwin, 1975. 1st edition. Hardback. Antiquarian: very good condition (small knick on the side of the dustjacket).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (1985)

Unwin Book, 1979. 1st edition as paperback. Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Antiquarian: very good condition (spine faded, wear around the edges, creases in cover).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (1990)

Unwin Paperbacks, 1990. Tenth impression. Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Cover by Nicki Palin. Antiquarian: very good condition (owner's stamp on flyleaf, spine faded).*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo. Ballantine

Tolkien's translation of this Medieval heroic poem. Paperback. Cover by Michael Dringenberg.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo (2006)

HarperCollins, 2006
Tolkien's translation of these Medieval poems. Paperback. Cover by John Howe.*

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Sir Orfeo de luxe

HarperCollins, 2020

1st edition. Hardback (no dustjacket issued). In a decorated slipcase.

This elegant deluxe slipcased edition of three medieval English poems, translated by Tolkien for the modern-day reader and containing romance, tragedy, love, sex and honour, features a beautifully decorated text and includes as a bonus the complete text of Tolkien’s acclaimed lecture on Sir Gawain.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Pearl are two poems by an unknown author written in about 1400. Sir Gawain is a romance, a fairy-tale for adults, full of life and colour; but it is also much more than this, being at the same time a powerful moral tale which examines religious and social values.

Pearl is apparently an elegy on the death of a child, a poem pervaded with a sense of great personal loss: but, like Gawain it is also a sophisticated and moving debate on much less tangible matters.

Sir Orfeo is a slighter romance, belonging to an earlier and different tradition. It was a special favourite of Tolkien’s.

The three translations represent the complete rhyme and alliterative schemes of the originals, and are uniquely accompanied in this special deluxe slipcased edition with the complete text of Tolkien’s acclaimed 1953 W.P. Ker Memorial Lecture that he delivered on Sir Gawain.

Includes a double-sided colour frontispiece reproducing a facsimile of Tolkien's own manuscript translation of Gawain's Leave-Taking. Four specially commissioned illustrations by Bill Sanderson depicting scenes from the poem. Available for a limited time only.*

Finn and Hengest. The Fragment and the Episode

HarperCollins, reprint. Tolkien's translation and analyses of this heroic poem from the 5th century. Paperback. Cover by John Howe.*

Ancrene Wisse

Early English Text Society. No. 249

Oxford University Press, 1962. 1st editon. Hardback (includes the transparant dustjacket). With two illustrations.

This is Tolkien's edition of the Ancrene Riwle, a thirteenth century manuscript known as MS. CCCC 402 or MS. Corpus Christi College Cambridge 402 - A Rule for Nunnes or Recluses - Ancrene Wisse.

Tolkien was formally engaged by the Early English Text Society in 1935 to edit the manuscript for publication, but owing to endless delays, it was not published until 1962. The bulk of the book consists of a line-by-line transcription of the text, along with extensive footnotes.

Antiquarian: fine condition.*

Beowulf. The Monster and the Critics. 1936

1st edition

Sir Israel Gollancz Memorial Lecture British Academy. Oxford University Press, 1936. Publication with Tolkien's famous lecture. Just 500 copies printed. Antiquarian: fine condition, unusual for this publication. The edges of the pages are rough (as in all copies) for the block was not cut. Binding tight, with only slight paper loss on top and bottom. Some browning to the pages, but very clean. Slight crease in the title page.*

The Monster and the Critics and Other Essays (1997).

HarperCollins, 1997. Seven essays by Tolkien (on Beowulf, the English language, fairy tales and on his translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight). Paperback. Picture of Tolkien on the cover. Antiquarian: fine condition.*

The Monster and the Critics and Other Essays (2007)

HarperCollins, 2007
Seven essays by Tolkien (on Beowulf, the English language, fairy tales and on his translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight). Paperback. Picture of Tolkien on the cover.*

Dimitra Fini (ed.), A Secret Vice

Tolkien on Invented Languages

HarperCollins, 2020. 1st edition. Paperback. Edited by Dimitra Fimi and Andrew Higgins.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s linguistic invention was a fundamental part of his artistic output, to the extent that later on in life he attributed the existence of his mythology to the desire to give his languages a home and peoples to speak them. As Tolkien puts it in ‘A Secret Vice’, ‘the making of language and mythology are related functions’’.

In the 1930s, Tolkien composed and delivered two lectures, in which he explored these two key elements of his sub-creative methodology. The second of these, the seminal Andrew Lang Lecture for 1938–9, ‘On Fairy-Stories’, which he delivered at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, is well known. But many years before, in 1931, Tolkien gave a talk to a literary society entitled ‘A Hobby for the Home’, where he unveiled for the first time to a listening public the art that he had both himself encountered and been involved with since his earliest childhood: ‘the construction of imaginary languages in full or outline for amusement’.

This talk would be edited by Christopher Tolkien for inclusion as ‘A Secret Vice’ in The Monsters and the Critics and Other Essays and serves as the principal exposition of Tolkien’s art of inventing languages. This new critical edition, which includes previously unpublished notes and drafts by Tolkien connected with the essay, including his ‘Essay on Phonetic Symbolism’, goes some way towards re-opening the debate on the importance of linguistic invention in Tolkien’s mythology and the role of imaginary languages in fantasy literature.*